Not surprisingly, America’s divorce rate has changed dramatically over the years. An article from The Insider examines the changes, and the reasons behind them, dispelling myths about the current divorce rate along the way.

 

When The Divorce Rate Began To Rise

For many years, people married for much different reasons than they do today. Property rights and upward mobility were the primary motives. In the mid-1800s, the tide began to turn, with more couples beginning to marry for love.

Interestingly, this was when the divorce rate began to slowly rise. In the decades preceding 1879, there were only .3 divorces for every 1,000 people. By the end of the turn of the century, the number rose to .9, and then to 1 by 1910.

In the 1940s, the number of divorces increased to 3.4 for every 1,000 people. It rose steadily through the following decades. The article attributes the increase to women entering the workforce and gaining more independence.

In the 1950s, the number of divorces decreased to 2.1 for every 1,000 people, thanks in part to the ideal of the All-American, nuclear family. In the ensuing decades, however, it rose again, reaching 5.3 by the end of the 1970s.

Do Half Of All Marriages Really End In Divorce?

In the 1980s, the number of divorces slowed and eventually began to decline. It continued to decline in the following decades.

In 2017, the number of divorces dropped to 2.9 for every 1,000 Americans, the lowest it has been since the 1960s. The article claims this is the result of younger generations choosing to get married at a later age or not getting married at all.

This most recent number shatters the myth that 50 percent of all marriages end in divorce. While divorce is still a relatively common and important option, it is not as widespread as some believe it to be.

Those considering divorce may want to review their options with the assistance of a trusted attorney from Martson Law Offices. We bring extensive experience to family law cases of all kinds and can help you understand how to move forward.